Books

Books on the West we think you might like – High Country News

Summary

Some brand new, some from the shelves, some for the kids and some for you.

 

When you live in the West, with its magnificent mountains and sublime deserts, sometimes you feel like you need darkness as an excuse to stay inside instead of enjoying another afternoon in the great outdoors. But now that Daylight Saving Time has ended, the season of early evenings has arrived — and the time is right to plunge into the pleasures of reading. Since the…….

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Some brand new, some from the shelves, some for the kids and some for you.

 

When you live in the West, with its magnificent mountains and sublime deserts, sometimes you feel like you need darkness as an excuse to stay inside instead of enjoying another afternoon in the great outdoors. But now that Daylight Saving Time has ended, the season of early evenings has arrived — and the time is right to plunge into the pleasures of reading. Since there are so many great books about the West out there, we asked staff what drew them in this year, either for the first time or once again. We hope you’ll find something to keep you informed, inspired and entertained, at least until the snow flies and it’s time to wax up your skis. Until then, happy reading!

Site Fidelity: Stories 

by Claire Boyles
208 pages, hardcover: $16
W. Norton & Company, June 2021 

I loved these interconnected short stories, which cover decades and distance but keep returning to the high plains of northeastern Colorado. The characters wrestle with the landscape — with its beauty, its vulnerability, its harshness — and with each other, and while few find peace, all discover new means of coexistence. The audiobook, performed by a varied cast, is a delight. 

—Michelle Nijhuis, contributing editor

Raven’s Witness: The Alaska Life of Richard K. Nelson

by Hank Lentfer 
Hardcover, 256 pages: $22
The Mountaineer Books, 2020 

Richard K. Nelson was a devoted student of the Athabaskan and Alaska Native people he lived with and learned from. As an anthropologist, he bucked convention every step of the way, and his life and work were richer for it. Fellow Alaskan Hank Lentfer does a wonderful job teasing out the poignant moments from Nelson’s life and work, weaving them into a lovely tribute that illuminates what makes a life extraordinary.

—Jennifer Sahn, editor-in-chief

Dangerous Subjects: James D. Saules and the Rise of Black Exclusion in Oregon

by Kenneth R. Coleman
Softcover, 240 pages: $20
Oregon State University Press, October 2017

I’m a stickler for good historical work that reads like fiction. The story of James Saules, a Black whaler who settled for a stint in the Pacific Northwest in the mid-1800s seems just as relevant in 2021. I love how it challenges Oregon’s origin myth, painting a picture of a diverse, multi-ethnic society in the midst of a battle over identity, belonging and race.

—Sarah Sax, climate justice fellow, North Desk

Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote

by Duncan Tonatiuh
Hardcover, 32 pages: $18
Harry N. Abrams, 2013 

Drought, border politics, corruption and agricultural justice don’t usually appear in children’s books, but Tonatiuh has crafted a …….

Source: https://www.hcn.org/articles/books-on-the-west-we-think-you-might-like